Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Celebrating Banned Books Week



We're celebrating Banned Books Week  in the library. This is a great chance to look at issues of censorship and intellectual freedom.  Come see our display and check out a banned or challenged book to read.  Explore more: 

The top 10 most frequently challenged books in 2013 in the U.S. 
(from challenges reported to the ALA office of intellectual freedom)
  1. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group, violence
  2. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence
  3. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E.L. James
    Reasons
    : Nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  5. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
  6. A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl, by Tanya Lee Stone
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  8. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
    Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  9. Bless Me Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
    Reasons: Occult/Satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  10. Bone (series), by Jeff Smith
    Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence
Catherine  & Lisa

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Books for a Rainy Day

With rainy weather finally on the way - pick up a book to cozy up with.  These Rainy Day Reads are available in the library.


Doctor Sleep by Stephen King

The most recent novel (or has he snuck in another one?) by King will immerse you in the small town world where Danny, last seen in the Shining, has landed as a recovering alcoholic.  But Danny's brushes with the strange didn't end when the Overlook Hotel burned down.  Children with powers like his are being hunted by a tribe of murderous paranormals.  Let King take you to a world much like this one, just a little more dangerous.

Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese

It's been a few years since the story of these twin boys born to an Indian Nun in Ethiopia topped the bestseller lists.  If you missed it then, take the time to dive into the rich detailed writing that follows the twins around the world and into the heart of medicine.

Kindred by Octavia Butler

"I lost an arm on my last trip home. My left arm."  So begins Octavia Butler's story of time travel and slavery.  Normally a science fiction writer, Butler here allows the time travel to remain unexplained in order to focus on love and family and the deep scars of history.

Big Girl Small by Rachel DeWoskin

This story of a little person making her way in a performing arts high school is compelling even before we find out about what made her the object of a nation-wide scandal.  DeWoskin writes with deft humor and refused to make any of her characters all good or all bad.

When You are Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris

Serious and funny by turns, this volume of essays will keep you turning pages as he bring his observations the story of the parasitic worm in his mother-in-law's leg, an encounter with a dingo, and his attempt to quit smoking in Tokyo.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Book Swap in the IHS Library: faculty & students exchange 'goodreads'

Sharing our passion for reading.   Students and faculty exchange books and recommendations. Everyone left with something to read over Winter Break--digital or print, not important.  We just want to read.

Friday, December 13, 2013

Finals week begins

On the first day of finals the library was full of studying.
A heated game of RISK.
















Figuring out where in the world we landed with GeoGuesser ..



Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Mathematical Hubbub

This afternoon when I gave a particularly rowdy table a pointed librarian look (actual shushing is so passé), they told me "Don't mind us.  Math is just very emotional for us right now." I went over to the table to find that indeed a passionate discussion about factoring quadratic equations was underway. It soon degenerated/elevated into a conversation about whether zero is a number.



Want more math in your life?  We're here for you.  Find Mathematics: A Very Short Introduction on our shelves (a part of the brightly colored short introduction series from Oxford).  Or visit questiaschool.com to learn more about The Irrationals.  Starting to doubt yourself about whether zero is a number?  This column on straight dope explores the question.

Thursday, November 7, 2013